Electric eVito hits the sweet spot for Mango Logistics

Mango Logistics’ search for a larger, battery-powered van to supplement its zero-emission fleet bore fruit, in the shape of what is believed to be the UK’s first used Mercedes-Benz eVito. Supplied by Ciceley Commercials, which represents Mercedes-Benz in Lancashire, Greater Manchester, Cumbria and south-west Scotland, the ex-demonstrator was less than a year old.

“We were already running a pair of smaller plug-in vans and 20 electric cargo bikes for city-centre deliveries,” revealed Henri Purvis, Last Mile Consultant with central London-based Mango Logistics. “The next step was a larger van, to handle bigger deliveries.”

As it produces zero tailpipe emissions, the eVito is also exempt from the London Congestion Charge of £11.50 per day. “The delivery sector in London has undergone rapid change, though, and is still evolving fast,” continued Purvis. “The vast majority of our work is carried out inside what is now the Ultra Low Emissions Zone that takes in much of the city centre. “We’ve invested heavily in our electric cargo bikes, each of which can carry up to 250kg, but they’re not a solution for every situation. Sometimes we need to carry heavier loads over longer distances, so electric vans are the answer.”

“Working around central London, the van will rarely cover more than 50 miles a day, but with lots of stopping and starting, it’s in its element,”Purvis added. “The drive is very smooth and easy, with instant torque and no gear changes to worry about. It’s a great addition to our fleet and works beautifully for final-mile delivery work.”

Mango Logistics’ Long-bodied eVito Progressive offers a payload allowance of 905kg and has a 6.0mcargo bay, which is easily accessed through sliding doors on both sides, as well as back doors. The van’s 41kWh battery is securely mounted in a protective housing beneath the floor, which means it does not impinge on the available load space.

Mango Logistics has installed a charge point so the 3.2-tonne van can leave base with the full charge that will keep it on the road for approximately 92 miles. Should a longer journey be required, the driver can top up at one of the capital’s growing number of public charging points, for which the operator has a range of accounts.

Source: logisticsmanager.com

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